About your Search

20120901
20120930
STATION
FOXNEWS 43
CSPAN 17
MSNBCW 15
CSPAN2 14
MSNBC 14
WHUT (Howard University Television) 10
FBC 9
CNN 8
CNNW 8
KQED (PBS) 8
WETA 8
KRCB (PBS) 4
KNTV (NBC) 3
WMPT (PBS) 3
KPIX (CBS) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 223
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 223 (some duplicates have been removed)
the challenges iraq faces after the country has yet to finalize a law dictating the use of oil profits. tension continues to rise over the oil rights in the government of baghdad and the kurdish region. this is about an hour and a half. >> thank you for the policy event of the fall semester and i would just mention in the way that advertisement we will be having our next program on october 23rd and we will get a notice but it will be on jordan. i think i put a title belt there in the crosshairs and we are very fortunate to have dr. washer who is the vice president for studies of the carnegie endowment for the national peace, for our foreign minister of jordan and a free good personal friend who will be coming as well as dr. kurt ryan who is this a sea of political science at appalachian state university and a scholar and person who's written a lot about jordan. so that should be very interesting forum. but tonight, as we gather i always express my appreciation to the exxonmobil corporation which is a founder and a dillinger and gives us a substantial contribution each year to be able to put on
? yes. ok - that's fine. >> i served in iraq recently and and i would be curious as to whether the report gives attention to the work we have done in iraq. there were a number of projects that n.e.d. was involved in in iraq and the republican institute assisting the iraqis preparing for elections. i was working at the provincial reconstruction team level. we have voter education as one project. we instructed iraqi schoolchildren on the concept of human rights and the role of the elections in a democratic society for grades 1-12. we were doing work in this area. iraqis complained that some of our efforts in public health was not being sufficiently publicized to the iraqi public. >> we did not really deal too much with the situation in iraq. we were looking at it from a more global point of view. many of the things you're talking about are the kinds of projects that would come under this strategy now. iraq was a different situation. we were there at large numbers with large forces and could operate in a more direct way than we could generally speaking. >> also, i don't want in a
. they are there. multiple tours serving for this country in iraq and afghanistan. also glen doherty. the former navy seal 42 years old. according to the secretary of state he was an experienced navy seal, paramedic in. a statement his brother said that he joined the seals in 1995 because he had a desire to push himself and to use his talent to make general june change in the world. i have standing by colonel jack jacobs. i'm hoping that we can talk with the colonel about what we are witnessing here. the white house is saying that this is not the so-called dignified transfer of remains. but a ceremony nonetheless. the transfer of remains. you've seen this too many times when it's been soldiers fighting for our country. these are diplomats who were working and serving as the face of our country. around the world. >> this kind of ceremony takes place all the time down in dover, delaware, where the bodies of the fallen come back from southwest asia after fighting in afghanistan and iraq. this is a very big deal for the white house because it breaks to have been control of the natural security high
to make clear that even though he was elected as an opponent of the iraq war, he does not shrink from using power in the muslim world. >> religion is used to justify the murder of innocents by those who have distorted and defiled the great religion of islam. and who attacked my country. i face the world as it is. and cannot stand idle in the face of threats to the american people. chris: but governor romney was suggesting weakness and now the tarke on our consulate in benghazi where four americans were murdered. >> we express immediately when we feel that the president and his administration have done something which is inconsistent with the principles of america. chris: a similar test after the failed mission to rescue the iranian hostages, during the presidential campaign of 1980, governor ronald reagan did not use a vulnerable moment to crilt size president carter. -- to criticize president carter. >> words should be few and confined to our prayers. because of the extremely sensitive nature of the situation, i am convinced that it is and would be inappropriate for me to go beyond t
in return for stability and security, especially with the examples of instability in lebanon and iraq on their borders. and so, that was the mandate. that was legitimacy for the asides to rule. they lost that because of the policy and bashar al-assad unleashing the dogs in terms of cracking down the opposition. his policy in instability and insecurity. so he no longer has legitimacy. in a broader sense he is solid. whether he stays in power, he'll never have the mandate to rule again and legitimacy he once enjoyed. >> host: are western policymakers assuming his fall is inevitable? and should they? >> guest: that's interesting. i've been contacted by media outlets wanting a quarter to an obituary for about a year now. every time the call, i say it's premature because the regime has the wherewithal and maybe more importantly the willingness to stay in power and do what it takes to stay in power. so i think the united states and the west and others opposed to the assad regime have backed up these predictions of imminent demise. every time there is a prominent affection, everyone says the
that when they lose, and if they lose, they're going to be cast out. it'll be like the sunnis in iraq, who were cleaned out of every major government agency. >> over time, bashar al-assad was successful in convincing the majority of the alawites that his political survival is synonymous with their physical survival. and they have started seeing this fight in existential terms. >> it's very understandable why alawites would believe today that if they were to lose, they would lose more than the privileges that the regime has had. they would lose everything. >> narrator: the alawites' improbable rise to power in syria was set in motion by bashar's father, hafez al-assad. his path to power was through the military, which was dominated by alawites. a rising star in syria's socialist ba'ath party, at age 40, he engineered a coup to seize the presidency. >> hafez al-assad rose to power from the bottom up. he had to fight the battles that came with the coup d'├ętats, that came with trying to corral the different forces of the country into his camp. >> he knew he had to gain support of the other mi
president bush. he was in the white house during the 9/11 attacks and the beginning of the world iraq. it's great to have you back here today or i would like to get your perspective on what we're seeing today. >> well, this is a terrible time for the folks in the white house. as well as the intelligence communities and the defense department. my heart and prayers are with them as they make tough decisions. the president's primary responsibility is to protect americans and to make sure america's national security interests are upheld. we also have to remember that we need strong leadership. president obama should be providing strong leadership filled with resolve. he should have the patience of diplomacy, it is very important right now. our diplomats have to be practicing tough diplomacy. this is a time when we and we have to count on our allies standing tall with us. as president bush said, you are either with us or against us. that was a very important message to send around the world. we hope that president obama is sending a similar message. you have to stand with america. we are not a
in america for anything, it's for a bad reason. when they were flowing into iraq to martyr themselves trying to kill american troops in iraq, al qaeda documents seized by the u.s. army in iraq showed the little town of derna in libya sent more volunteers to die in iraq in 2006 and 2007 than any other place in the entire arab world. libya, per capita, as a country, sent more fighters to iraq than any other country, but it was specifically derna, that town, that sent the highest number of fighters. the most. full stop. and in 2008 the man who would become our ambassador, christopher stevens, he went to derna to assess the state of militancy and anti-americanism there. .and his cable back to washington actually used the bruce willis movie "diehard" as an analysis for understanding how intense the local attitudes were there about jihad. once the uprising against moammar gadhafi was under way, cnn reported this june that al qaeda central, the part that used to be headed by bin laden, al qaeda central dispatched a top operator from the tribal areas in pakistan to go to derna, to go to that part of
in the navy where he served in iraq and afghanistan. glen doherty was 42 years old. jenna: u.s. beefing up military presence off the libyan coast, ordering two destroyers into the region. the uss mcfall is set to arrive within days. both ships are armed with tomahawk cruise missiles that can be fired at targets on land. the navy is calling this a precautionary step. the ships are not operating under a specific mission but we're keeping an eye on that. we're learning more about the groups that may or may not have been behind those attacks across the middle east. in libya fox news confirming that u.s. intelligence is focusing on a handful of organizations including the libyan islamic fighting group. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge live in washington. maybe an unfamiliar group with some of us, catherine. what are we learning about the investigation into libya. >> reporter: thank you, jenna. fox news confirmed the fbi has a team on the ground in libya to identify suspects, gather evidence and assess whether a prosecution is possible. as fox news was first to report the targ
soldier in iraq. the soldier was born in oklahoma to welsh mother and u.s. navy father read his parents fell in love. his father was stationed at the u.s. military base in wales. the soldier showed early promise as a boy, winning top prizes at science fairs three years in a row. he believed in the truth. like all of us, he hated hypocrisy. he believed in the party and the right for all of us to pursue happiness. he believed in the values that founded an independent united states. he believes and medicine, justice, and pain. like many teenagers, he was unsure what to do with his life. he knew he wanted to defend his country. he knew he wanted to learn about the world. he entered the u.s. military, and like his father, trained as an intelligence analyst. in late 2009, age 21, he was deployed to iraq. there, it is alleged, he sought u.s. military that did not often follow the rule of law and she sought u.s. military that did not often follow the rule of law. it is alleged it was there in baghdad in 2010 that he gave to wikileaks, gave to me, and alleged he gave to the world details that ex
hard to get this dofnlt i hope we can confirm our ambassadors to iraq and afghanistan, and the continuing resolution to fund the government for six months. republicans say this congress has been unproductive. but if republicans want to know why it's been unproductive, they should take a look in the mirror. benjamin franklin once said, "well-done is better than well-said." close quote. "well-done is better and well-said." so it is time republicans stopped talking about how much they wanted to get things done and started working with us to actually get things done. the presiding officer: the republican leader. mr. mcconnell: yesterday dozens of republican senators came to the senate floor one after the other to register their complete frustration with the way democrats are running this place. never before -- never -- have a president and a majority party in the senate done so little to address challenges as great as the ones our nation faces right now. never. i mean, we've got a $16 trillion debt, and they haven't bothered to put together a budget in three years. they ha
spread to yemen, tunisia, iraq, elsewhere. at this hour, two navy destroy years plus a team of marines are scrambling in the persian gulf. go live to fox news foreign correspondent leland vittert on the ground in cairo. put a picture -- >> reporter: eric, this i belowe is a large street battle going back and forth between the egyptian police and riots in egypt as they try to storm the u.s. embassy, the egyptian police now 48 hours after the rioters got inside the compound are able to push these people back using a combination of tear gas, and rubber bullets that is now continuing well in the night here. 11:00 p.m. in cairo. it's still going strong. ricochets of the rubber bullets is piercing the air here in cairo. the difference, though, the equipages police defending the embassy compound and keeping the rioters out. they're a combination of heavily anti-american and angry over the anti-prophet muhammad movie. a number of them chanting "with our blood, our soul we defend you, o, prophet." injuries in the hundreds. one thing egyptian police are not doing is arresting a lot of people. go
because of iraq and because of guantanamo. they hated us because of the torture -- he used the word and accuses his own country ever torturing. and he is now apologizing and promising to change course. we would no longer be tough. we would be loved. we would show compassion. and we would get out of iraq. he set a deadline for afghanistan. he doesn't support the green revolution in iran. he shows the ayatollahs tremendous respect. he essentially protects them when they are under attack. he gets nowhere on the iran nuclear issue. he is equivocal in the arab spring. he leads from behind in libya. the theory was if we go soft and we are very nice, if we -- if we say [speaking in arabic [enough times, it will be all right. he decided, the theory and therefore the practice is going to be, retreat and withdraw. remember the line he uses? the tide of war is receding. >> sean: exactly. >> that means the tide of american power is receding. and the reason that american interests, schools, embassies, businesses are aflame in the middle-east from tunis to south asia is because things don't happe
, which clearly is and there are armed groups all around, it's almost like iraq or afghanistan, where those embassies have to provide really firm security around the ambassador. and you know that. around iraq and afghanistan. they hire not even local security guards. they get nationals have other countries. mongolians and other countrys to work so they don't get paid off to get out of there. >> guest: baghdad, and kabul are the gold standard in terms of defending embassy people and staff and consuls and certainly in the embassy, itself. the reality is, we would not say this, but we know the situation is so volatile and the threat is so high in those countries that are own security forces capable of defending the institution, regardless of the capacity of the security forces. security forces grew in capacity over the years and they were able to hem us. i think when we determine the investigation of what took place here we will find out that we should have had a much largeer and capable security force of our own, protecting that consulate. >> bret: how does this happen, do you think, ge
of the world, we pulled out of iraq, we pulled out of afghanistan, and iran is continuing on with the nuclear program and our critics say our allies do not trust us. >>guest: that is false. partners and allies have responded effectively and promptly when we asked them to protect our facilities. >>chris: well, it took three days in cairo. >>guest: what happened in cairo was not sufficiently oh bust when president obama picked up the phone and together to president morsi, and right away things changed. what happened is the authorities in egypt have been robust in protecting our facility, not just in cairo but elsewhere in the country. president morsi has calmed for calm. we saw the same thing in yemen, in libya, tunisia. >>chris: so why ask all nongovernmental personnel to leave tunisia and sudan? >>guest: but are not asking all nongovernmental personnel. >>guest: we assess the security conditions necessity this, we have asked temporarily family members and nonessential personnel depart. we do that all over the world when security circumstances warrant. it is short-term. it is temporary. it is
think about the war in iraq. where did most of the anti-u.s. soldiers and militants come from? they came from benghazi. it is not like we didn't know there is it a problem >> look. every country in the region has a radical islamic movement that is operating inside of it. and they move fighters around you they make no mistake about it and final question. have we gained anything by our involvement in the middle east? should we change our strategy. and like any president wouldn't. given what is happening to us. and our policy now is unstate we saw it unfold over the last three plus years we are disengaging from the middle east. our friends say why aren't you standing here with us. look at iran. permitting them to have a nuclear weapon and we have a feckless policy that is not standing up to them and we are pulling out of iraq despite the recommendation and turn it over to iranian influence and time table in afghanistan as well >> thank you so much. and are we angry enough over the violence in the middle east? ambassador bolton next and finding justice for four americans killed in [ male ann
to all of the hot spots, lebanon, kuwait, syria, pakistan, iraq and afghanistan where we met during a taliban rocket attack. he knew chris stevens. >> i knew ambassador stevens, chris, almost from the time he joined the foreign service back to 1991. one of the best and brightest he could work washington as well as he could work the hard places in the field. he was in all of them. cairo, damascus, jerusalem and several years in libya. he was brel yant and both at home and bureaucracy and abroad defending our interests yet one of the most good humored easy going unindividuals. many people lost a great diplomat and the libyan people lost a great advocate. >> should we respond with boots on the ground? t it is in response to the terrible act. >> it is a terrible act. we thiwe have to be careful in we respond. what we have to do is work with a living government that quickly denounced this awful crime. wref we have to bring our assets to bear with theirs and we have to track down those who are responsible or whoever this leads. we have to be careful not to react in a kind of way that is g
have decimated al qaeda. osama bin laden is dead. he said we would end the war responsibly in iraq. we've done that. he has restored relationships around the world. i spend every day up at the united nations where i have to interact with 192 other countries. i know how well the united states is viewed. i know that our standing is much improved. and it's translated into important support for strong american positions, for example -- >> is it inappropriate for governor romney to level the criticism he leveled? >> i'm not going to get into politics, david. that's not my role in this job. but i think the american people welcome and appreciate strong, steady, unified leadership, bipartisan, in times of challenge. and for those men and women in our diplomatic service, including those we tragically lost, they look to our leadership to be unified and strong. >> let's talk about leadership in the world, and as the nuclear threat from iran. another area of tension between the united states and israel. in just a couple of minutes, we will show our interview with the prime minister of israel, benj
that part of the world that we pulled out of iraq, we are are pulling out of afghanistan, that iran is continuing on with its nuclear program and they say our critics is that our allies no longer trust us and our enemies no longer fear us. >> chris, that is just false. our partners and allies value voters responded effectively and promptly when we have asked them to protect our facilities and our people. >> chris: well, let's -- it took three days in cairo. >> and what happened initially in cairo was not sufficiently robust when president obama picked up the phone and spoke to the president right away things changed. and that is an evidence of our influence and impact and what happened was that the authorities in egypt have been very robust in protecting our facilities not just in cairo but elsewhere in the country. the president has issued repeated condemnations of the violent response and called for calm and we have seen the same thing in yemen, in libya, in tunisia and many other parts of the world. >> why are we asking all nongovernmental personnel to leave sudan and tunisia. >>
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 223 (some duplicates have been removed)